Client Attraction in The Era of Digital Privacy

Welcome to Part 1 of this 2 part series on client attraction in the era of digital privacy, in which we are going to go back to first principles, decide what matters and then rebuild our post iOS 14.5 worldview based on long held principles that have proven their worth.

With that said, if at any point you want to REMOVE yourself from this series you can do so at any time by just clicking this link

No hard feelings.

I only want you to receive these emails if they're valuable to you.

One of the core principles I live by is transparency. So, before I dive in, I want to explain something important.

There’s nothing for sale this week which is about laying the foundations of what I hope will be a long term relationship between us.

When we do anything new, we naturally follow people more experienced than ourselves, do what they recommend and make a lot of mistakes trying to emulate them. 

We forget that those people are a lot further down the road than we are… so their exact recommendations may not work as well for us where we are.

In a previous life, I was an Olympic sailing event manager. I was on the water in Greece watching a women’s race. The leader was a good 150 metres in front. This was the first time she had led a race… ever.

To be so far in front of her idols was scary. These were Olympic medal winners. Icons in their sport.  She was well outside her comfort zone. Sure enough, she started to make mistake after mistake until she was back in the pack where she felt she belonged.

Learning to lead is about breaking old thought patterns and accepted wisdom and getting comfortable with that uncomfortable feeling of being out in front of the pack.

I tell you this because if we are going to continue to be successful  in the brave new world where peeps will be able to choose whether to allow intrusive tracking or not (probably not) we have to be ready to step outside our comfort zone and do things that may feel scary.

Just remember that the person who sets the goal is never the person who achieves it. That that person will have evolved, grown and expanded their boundaries by doing things they’ve never done before…

Like leading a race

Or 

Like deciding what the most important output in their business really is then optimising for that one thing.

I’m going to ask you to challenge everything you think you know about digital marketing by asking yourself WHY you do things the way you do. 

Is it because you accepted conventional wisdom? 

Or 

Is it because it’s one of the first principles of good marketing?

Like… 

Marketing is not about methods or tactics. It’s about knowing your peeps better than anyone else (even themselves) and then making yourself indispensable to them.

In the brave new world where privacy is paramount, where trust is truly valued and where you are in business to serve your peeps as best as you possibly can long before money changes hands, we have to be clear eyed about why we are in business in the first place and what we are in business to achieve.

If we are, we will see that the era of digital privacy is really a massive opportunity for those who choose to take it.

It is an opportunity to establish a new base line from which to work. One that rejects accepted wisdom and focuses on immutable principles.

We are going back to the future… 

To truly focus on authentic relationships based on shared core values and beliefs which are integral to the product or service we offer.

Because only when we do this, will we be able to steer a steady course through the chaos that iOS 14.5 brings. 

There will be many people promising they can beat the system with a new hack or shortcut that somehow will make getting miraculous results easier. 

I don’t have to remind you that simple does not mean easy. That easier is not necessarily better. That building a long term business is not built overnight but in increments…

Just like the performance required to win a gold medal. 

It may happen over 10 races in 5 days, as in sailing.

But it is the hours of practice over years and years on the water, in the gym, on the road bike and in the mind that produces that peak performance.

More than that, it is about having the opportunity to work with the right coaches and develop the right mental approach that makes all the difference.

Your business is a system.
Systems are circular.

Optimise one piece and the constraint moves elsewhere.
Not to the next logical step necessarily.
But somewhere else altogether.

The most important piece in that system is YOU and what you bring to the table.

Tomorrow we will architect the foundations to your success in the era of digital privacy…

In the meantime, hit reply if you have a question. 

Better still, if you want to push back on anything I’ve said, feel free to do so. 

I’ve been in some quite tight corners in my time. 

Both in Olympic sailing but also as a skipper of a 60 foot charter yacht.

So don’t hold back on my account 😉

Till tomorrow
Rory

PS: I bet you can’t connect all the dots with 4 lines without taking your pen off the paper 😉

PPS: Check out my about page to read more about yours truly here https://www.roryramsden.com/about/
.
.
.
Yesterday we covered the importance of being a leader, if we are going to continue to be successful  when it comes to client attraction in the era of digital privacy.  

And we decided that we have to be ready to step outside our comfort zone and do things that may feel scary. 

Pixels are powerless.
Cookies are kaput.

But stories have been with us since the dawn of time.
A proven way of building emotional connections.
A proven way of  creating the ultimate cookie.

Stories plant the germ of an idea that grows as you nurture it. That idea can change our worldview and inspire us to believe that we really can win a gold medal.

I’ve watched it happen over 4 Olympic cycles. A young sailor wins a junior world championship. Goes on to finish in the top 10 at his first senior event and 4 years later stand on the start line of an Olympic race as the youngest competitor in the fleet - not yet 20 - ready to teach battle hardened winners that he is their better.

Ben Ainslie did it at the 2000 Olympic Games… age 19 and went on to win more medals than any other sailor in history.

This is about our ability to manage risk.

You don’t have to win every race to win the series. You have to be consistent. Finish in the top 5 every time. 

And the way you do that is by positioning yourself effectively. Having a proven plain vanilla strategy (with a special twist) and being relentless about executing to the best of your ability.

It’s the same now in the era of digital privacy.
Facebook, Google, Youtube et al are having their wings clipped.
Either by governments legislating the excesses out of their business models.

Or by companies like Apple who see a commercial advantage in taking them on.

The world is turning. The market is evolving. What worked yesterday will not work tomorrow.

Necessarily.

I am not talking about throwing the baby out with the bath water.

We probably have all the tools we need to hand already.

It’s in our messaging that we have to change gear. Modify our existing strategy.Adjust our approach.

Nurture the people within our sphere of influence on our own terms.

Refine the journey we take our prospective clients on so they get to make their own decisions.

Without feeling they are under pressure from us.

Here’s a quote by Oren Klaff…

I don’t like being pressured into making a purchase. And I’m not alone. Over decades of being marketed, pitched, sold, and lied to, we’ve all grown resistant to sales persuasion. The moment we feel pressured to buy, we pull away. And if we’re told what to do or what to think, our defences go up. In other words, buyers don’t put much trust in you and your ideas. However, everyone trusts their own ideas.

Acknowledge this and you have the makings of the special twist you can add to your messaging strategy.

Did you see the movie “Inception” where a team of mental mercenaries led by Leonardo DiCaprio set out to implant an idea in someone's head in such a way that they make the mistake of believing it was their own?

That’s Oren’s speciality when it comes to making deals face to face. 

The question is…

How can we refine the digital journey we take our prospective clients on in such a way that it contains a series of pre-wired ideas that they accept as their own... 

And do so, in such a way that it feels completely natural?

When you have the answer, special things start to happen. 

People show up on your virtual doorstep out of nowhere ready to buy… They know what they are buying. They know why they are buying it. And 

They know how much it will cost them… 

Roughly. 

I’ve been meaning to ask…

Did you connect all the dots with 4 lines without taking your pen off the paper?


It’s an interesting mental experiment.
Maybe your first try look like this?


Or this, perhaps?

If so, it’s kinda like you set some predetermined boundaries in which the solution must be found. 

Much in the same way that one of your clients may see a challenge he thinks he has to resolve. When really that’s just a symptom of something much more profound. 

When you implant a series of pre-wired ideas that they accept as their own, you expand the field of possibilities…

More on that tomorrow…
.
.
.
It’s day 3.

We talked about Inception yesterday and of expanding our boundaries, taking the road less travelled and managing risk while being consistent. 

Before we go on, living in France has been a dream of mine since childhood. My uncle was half French. We got on well together so I had the opportunity of discovering the real France when I was a boy. Much later, my wife spent 15 months living in Paris. Now we are lucky enough to live in a little village in the south west. 

There’s been a produce market here every Thursday from 8 to 12 for the last 750 years. How’s that for consistency? 

It just so happens that the French team is a powerhouse in Olympic sailing so the jigsaw puzzle that is my life kinda all fits together somehow.

Anyhoo… Where were we?

Oh, Yes… 

Thinking about having a plain vanilla strategy with a special twist using pre-wired ideas…

That is, taking processes and systems that have proven to work and designing them in such a way that they fit the new circumstances.

That is managing risk by not putting all our eggs in one basket…

By not having one traffic generation strategy.
By not being reliant on one platform for that traffic.
By creating a sphere of influence (walled garden) to nurture our peeps.
And
By taking control back from Facebook, Google or any of the other behemoths by putting together the highest quality list possible.

And the fundamental tool with which to drive your client attraction in the era of digital privacy is Storytelling. Only with stories can you entertain, educate, question and immerse your audience in your world. 

With these pieces, we have the power to build our own business on land that we own...  Beholden to no one.

These are the foundational blocks for a long term business that will not only thrive in the era of digital privacy but also survive future black swan events that no one can foresee.

So what about prewired ideas and Inception?

You may feel that implanting notions in people’s heads is kinda creepy but it’s what you do when you tell a story… any story.  

Let me ask you.Have you ever left a movie theatre considering the moral of the story you have just watched?

In Star Wars, the moral to the story is that we have a responsibility to choose between good and evil.

But the underlying notion we take home is that there is good in everyone. 

Darth Vader, through the power of love is able to find redemption, return from the dark side and save the galaxy from the Emperor. 

The story is the vehicle that delivers the pre-wired idea.

Nothing creepy about that.  

All we are doing is using stories to move our prospective clients out of their comfort zones. We take them on a journey and give them the chance to accept new notions, at their own pace.

No pressure.

These notions become their ideas.

And as Oren Klaff says “Everyone trusts their own ideas.”

How do you know if a story is worth sharing? 

Simple — how does it make you feel when you tell it?

  • Sad?
  • Angry?
  • Inspired?
  • Moved?
  • Curious?
  • Engaged?
  • Anxious?
  • Powerful?

I share stories because I want my audience to feel something. 

If you don't feel something when you share the story, it's likely your audience won't feel anything either.

Stories also create tension, and tension seeks resolution. That need to resolve tension pulls your audience forward as if they're tethered to a giant elastic band.

And, just like the punch line of a good joke, there's a payoff when the story resolves. 

If you want to experience what this resolution feels like viscerally, listen to Kevin Costner tell Graham Norton about helping a difficult friend.

In less than two and a half minutes, Costner builds tension. 

That tension builds and builds and builds…Until it finally releases unexpectedly.

Listen to the audience's reaction at 2m24s - that's what resolution sounds like. 

That's what you want your audience to feel when you weave stories into your messaging.

Stories are all around you, waiting to be woven into your messaging. 

Start simple 

Pick a favourite scene in a movie that fits what you want your audience to feel and build a message around that.

Here are three options to choose from for practice.

Pick one that fits a project you're working on (or a project you hope to work on), and see where it leads. Weave the story in delicately, or make it the core idea.

The primary goal of a story is to elicit emotion. 

This can be overt or subtle. 

Both work because story is the (emotional) delivery vehicle for the (marketing) message.

A simple workflow I use goes like this:

  1. What is the outcome you want your audience to have?
  2. Find a story that creates context and a lead-in to deliver #1 (This rarely needs to be a story about you.).
  3. Explain the lessons learned.
  4. Show how this relates to your programme or container
  5. Call out your ideal client and deliver the CTA.

One last thing before we wrap up. 

The most important lesson I have shared with you is hidden in plain sight.

Once you see it, everything changes…
.
.
.
It’s time to move on from story to conversion. After all we need to prime the pump and make sure that as many high quality leads as possible choose to subscribe to our list and continue their journey...

(Reminder: this is part four in a five-part series.)

But first, the first order of business, is to offer you the opportunity to pull the pin and REMOVE yourself from Part 1 of this 2 part series of emails.

In Monday's email I asked you to challenge everything you think you know about digital marketing by asking yourself WHY you do things the way you do.

Tuesday's email was all about acknowledging that buyers buy how they want to buy not how we want to sell. In other words, buyers don’t put much trust in you and your ideas. They trust their own though.

On Wednesday, we talked about story being the fundamental tool with which to build our list. Only with stories can we entertain, educate, question and immerse our audience in our world. 

Today's email is about how we’re going to talk about conversion in the era of digital privacy.

Today we're going to talk about conversion when it comes to client attraction in the era of digital privacy. Again we'll start with a precise definition:

Conversion happens when someone buys.

Simple enough, right?

Well ... not so fast. 

Before your customer will do business with you he or she  has to know, like and trust you enough to part with their hard earned cash.

Trust is a two way street. You have to trust your customer too.That means you have to have a relationship.

A relationship that you both value (more than money).

That means you have to release the pressure.

Start by taking a long hard look at every step in your marketing and sales process, with this question in mind…

Is this how I would like to be treated?”

If the honest answer is NO then it’s time to go back to the drawing board and design a system that does.

For a start…

Treat your whole audience as customers before taking any money from them.

That doesn't mean you give away the farm but it does mean that you are willing, nay happy, to help them to start moving forward. To help them make progress towards their goals.

Whatever that might be.

By expressing how they feel, acknowledging the impact that that is having on their daily lives, their business and their relationships (there’s that word again), you make them feel better.

It’s not your fault’ is an overused phrase but more often than not, it’s true. Your audience sees what they think is an insurmountable problem stopping them moving forward.

But that’s just a symptom. The real problem is more profound. Just showing them how this is true gives them a new insight. A new perspective. Change the perspective and you change their lives.

When we do this, your audience begins to see how they could be your customers. They become open to the possibility of doing business with you.

Serving your audience like this makes them feel that you have their best interests at heart (because you do). 

The emotional bridge between you begins to take shape. 

It would be a pity to spoil it by rushing to a sale… any sale at any price.

A sale at say $9.95 means you acquire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of customers attracted to a too-good-to-be-true, $9.95 offer.

The net outcome is you acquire a boatload of opportunity seeking buyers with no guarantee that they are prepared to part with more than $9.95 in the future.

Who could have predicted that?

And if your response is, no, I’d add upsells and down-sells and so on to segment them into different groups of buyers. 

I refer you to my question above… “Is this how I would like to be treated?”

Sure, I know you have to cover your Ad spend but consider this…

After analysing his clients’ data, Internet marketing godfather Dean Jackson has concluded that...

Of your whole audience of say 500,000 people, only 30% will ever be in the market looking to buy.

Of these 150,000 only 3% may be ready to buy from you right now.

That’s 4,500 people.

15% of these may make a purchase in the first 90 days after becoming a lead.

That 675.

Of the remaining 85%, some may buy in the eighteen months that follow.

Think about that for a moment -- 85% of the opportunity, 85% of the revenue in your audience, is available after the first 90 days.

Spot quiz: Knowing that, what do you think is the single most important thing you can do to transform your business by making the most of this new found opportunity?

The pervasive idea that conversion must happen now and if a lead does not buy now, they should be carpet bombed with re-marketing Ads is damaging your business.

It minimises your R.O.A.S (Return on Ad Spend) and burns through that audience in next to no time.

Context matters. 

(We'll dive into this in tomorrow's email, then really -- really -- deep next week, if you wish to join us.)

The good news is that there is a better way.

Instead of pushing, cajoling, bribing, and strong-arming your audience to pull out their credit cards as quickly as possible, take a deep breath, relax, and treat them like they're already customers.

Take the pressure off.

Let them look around, ask questions, and make comments.

The moment you treat your audience like you would like to be treated, everything changes.

I mean everything changes.

Your audience is happier because they are being treated like they want to be treated and they feel the whole experience of being in your orbit is more enjoyable. 

You'll be happier because business is easier, less pushy and more relaxed. 

The irony of it all is when you stop trying so hard to sell, more people are ready to buy.

Weird, right?

So the moral of the story is that your goal must be to build relationships and you do this in your community.

Connection, community and conversion 

Relationships take time to develop. The more you see someone, the quicker that relationship builds.  That frequency is crucial when it comes to your marketing.

(Tomorrow I’m going to reveal one of the other constants I believe is, by far, the most important to your success.)

That constant is always lead with value.

Simply put… Give in advance without expectation or condition.

(I'll dip into that more next week. There's no space left in this email.)

In the meantime, consider how powerful it would be if you reorient your belief system so that, rather than seeing your audience as something to exploit, you  view your purpose in life to be of  service to your audience.

It will change everything you do.

And rightly so.

Your business is built on your understanding of your people and how well you provide for them what they dearly want (and need).

Dig deep to find out what matters most to them, and consistently find new, innovative, more powerful ways to identify and deliver that value.

When you truly embrace this idea, you'll begin to see the real secret to business success.

That's the subject of tomorrow's email.  I'll bring all of the parts of this series together into a coherent whole. (And, most likely, violate our 1,000-word-per email rule to make sure we get it right.)

See you then...

Rory

P.S: Reminder, next week I'll deconstruct how I think about conversion  in my one-on-one training programme which I call The Story Inception method.

Next week's emails are part of my Spring/Summer 2021 enrolment for that programme and require your explicit interest and consent. (I deeply value and respect your attention.)

If you'd like to learn more about how we think about creating stable, predictable, and scalable 'traffic', click here to be added to the interest segment. (You can one-click unsubscribe at any time.)
.
.
.
(Reminder: this is part five of a five-part series on client attraction in the era of digital privacy . 
If you haven't already, please read the 
firstsecondthird, and fourth emails, please do so now.)

Today we're going to bring this series to a close by sharing the single most important insight I've discovered in my 42+ years of starting and running businesses both offline and on.

(Note: Action is required if you want to receive Part II. See P.S.)

Before I do that, however, I want to reinforce what I’ve laid before you over the last four days.

Let's recap the week so far...

First: Learning to lead is about breaking old thought patterns and accepted wisdom and getting comfortable with that uncomfortable feeling of being out in front of the pack. 

I tell you this because if we are going to continue to be successful  in the brave new world where peeps will be able to choose whether to allow intrusive tracking or not (probably not), we have to be ready to step outside our comfort zone and do things that may feel scary.

Just remember that the person who sets the goal is never the person who achieves it. That that person will have evolved, grown and expanded their boundaries by doing things they’ve never done before…

Second: In the era of digital privacy, we’re not going to throw the baby out with the bathwater. We probably have all the tools we need to hand already.

It’s in our messaging that we have to change gear. Modify our existing strategy.Adjust our approach.

Nurture the people within our sphere of influence on our own terms.

Refine the journey we take our prospective clients on so they get to make their own decisions.

Without feeling they are under pressure from us.

We talked about ‘Inception’, ‘prewired ideas’  and the idea that people trust their own ideas for the very simple reason that they came up with them.

Third: We talked about stories and how they convey an underlying notion. In Star Wars, it was the idea that there is good in everyone. 

Darth Vader, through the power of love is able to find redemption, return from the dark side and save the galaxy from the Emperor. 

The story is the vehicle that delivers the pre-wired idea.

All we are doing is using stories to move our prospective clients out of their comfort zones. We take them on a journey and give them the chance to accept new notions, at their own pace.

The goal is to set the frame for our offer and put it in context.

Fourth: We focused on conversion and taking a long hard look at every step in our marketing and sales process, with this question in mind…

Is this how I would like to be treated?”

If the honest answer is NO then it’s time to go back to the drawing board and design a system that does.

For a start…

Treat your whole audience as customers before taking any money from them.

In the era of digital privacy, showing trust and respect for your audience’s attention (their most important asset) is paramount. ..

So far, so good.

But this is where we break with conventional wisdom, and why I believe you should too.

Conventional wisdom is based on flawed logic:

FL#1: Every buyer follows the same linear path. 

FL#2: Optimising the parts of the system separately improves overall performance. More traffic = more leads = more customers = more money.

Sadly this is not the case as we learn in ’The ‘Goal’ which unpacks the theory of constraints.

The single most powerful insight from this book is that if we optimise one part of our system, another constraint will appear in another seemingly unrelated place. 

Businesses are systems in which the parts interact to produce results only when taken as a whole. 

You cannot buy the best engine available, put it in the best chassis available then add the best wheels available and expect to have a winning car. 

They are just a collection of parts that were not built to fit together. 

Your business is a collection of subsystems that work together to produce something that no one part can create without the others.

Connection without Community or Conversion is vanity.

Connection and Conversion are subsystems, just like an engine or a drivetrain, that were not built to work together without Community.

Conversion and Community without Connection do not produce results.

Each subsystem is required but on it’s own is not enough to produce a result. All three must be present before the results we seek are possible.

Optimising Connection will mean we will have to re-optimise Community and Conversion. The system is circular, not linear.

Once you understand this, everything changes. 

Everything.

Instead of looking for the 'best' way to create ConnectionCommunity, and Conversion individually, we need to think about how each subsystem works with the others to produce the best overall results.

Example: We could optimise our business system to produce the most money but that might also produce unhappy customers and lead to low team morale so it would be a self-defeating short term goal.

Far better to optimise to produce happy customers and make all of our subsystems (Connection, Community, and Conversion) serve this goal.

Never optimise an individual subsystem without looking at the impact that has on all the others and how that will improve the single KPI that matters most… Happy customers.

How do we do this?

By focusing on core values:

  • Treat everyone like a valued customer, regardless of whether money has changed hands. 
  • Focus on delivering the result that our customer yearns for.
  • Tell memorable stories that attract people I want in my Community and repel the rest.``
  • Be Transparent. Show up as I really am. Warts and all. Don't create artificial barriers or force everyone into a one-size-fits-all process.
  • Play the long game. I realise that 85% of my new customers will convert in the next 18 months, not in the next 90 days so I plan accordingly.

Story inception is a powerful growth engine in which the subsystems are optimised to deliver these core values to our customers and for our customers. 

Its impact is profound. It changes how you do business. You become a story driven company rather than a competition driven company. 

If you are already a customer of mine, next week will be a deep-dive into the method I use to get the most from story inception. If you aren't, next week will be an opportunity to learn how to zig while everyone else is zagging.

However, my most important core value is that I walk my talk, which means you must actively, explicitly raise your hand to receive Part II of this series.

More on that below.

Thanks to all of you who joined me on this week's journey. As always, I deeply appreciate your attention and love to hear your feedback (just click 'reply' on this email).

If you want to also receive Part II, which is part of my spring/summer 2021 coaching cohort enrolment, click here to raise your hand.

Rory

P.S. Next week I'll be publishing another 5 part series where I'll unpack my one-on-one training programme which I call The Story Inception method. (This is a link to my book in which I lay out the whole strategy from A to Z - FREE access - No opt in required)

Next week's emails are part of our spring/summer 2021 enrolment for the first bit sized chunk of that programme and require your explicit interest and consent. (I deeply value and respect your attention.)

If you'd like to learn more about how I think about creating stable, predictable, and scalable 'traffic', click here to be added to the interest segment. (You can one-click unsubscribe at any time.)

NOTE: This was originally a five-part email series over five days, which I sent to all my email subscribers. This published version has been lightly edited for the web.

If you would like to get access to Part II (it’s free), you can join the list here.

Part II focuses on my flagship programme, The 
Story Inception Method and coincided with the spring/summer 2021 enrolment in the first bite sized chunk for this training which is the 30 Day Story Driven Workshop

>